5 Ways to tell if a LinkedIn Request is Fake

I received a connection request from Nathan Philippe yesterday. I always take a cursory look at any profile that wants to connect. The nature of LinkedIn is that we connect with some people we don’t know so taking the time to check out the profile is important with every request. I know so many people whose only criteria for vetting a potential connection is to see how many connections they have in common. But this is not enough.

So let`s take a look at this profile

nathan philippe linked in

  1. Take a look at how many connections the individual has. In this case when “Nathan” sent the request he had 22 connections.  That is red flag #1 to take a closer look at a profile.  It the sender is a young professional then it makes sense they may be new to LinkedIn and building their network. It is more unusual for an established professional to be joining.
  2. Take a look at where they are from and where they work.  In this case “Nathan” stated he worked for Liberty Bank in Fredericton.  Being Canadian myself I knew there was no such bank.  But for the sake of due diligence, I searched to make sure my hunch was correct.  Second of all when I clicked on the Liberty Bank Logo he placed in his profile, it linked to Liberty Bank in Tblisi, Georgia….a bit of a distance from Fredericton
  3. Take a look at their education. “Nathan” wrote that he attended the University of New Brunswick and received a BA of Law and then put LLB by his name.  A BA in Law does not earn you the LLB and the University of New Brunswick does not offer law degrees.
  4. With the previous red flags I decided to run a reverse image search of his profile picture on tineye.  The search came back noting that the photo was listed on a scammer site.

nathan tin eye5. Go with your gut. If a profile looks iffy to you then it might be.  It’s better not to connect at all then connect with someone who will mine your information and that of your connections.

 

Nejolla consults and teaches seminars in the area of Social Media Risk. Her website is http://www.interveritas.com

Reputation Risk and Social Media: Where personal and professional worlds collide

Social media has become the murky water where personal and professional reputations are shared, liked, posted and sometimes annihilated. The ability to share anything on the spot has become the bane of many an organization and the people who work for them.

Just a week ago a young veterinarian Kristen Lindsey was fired for posting and boasting about  a picture of herself with a cat that she had killed with a bow and arrow.  While police couldn’t charge Lindsey until they determined if the picture was real or not, her employer didn’t hesitate to take action. The Washington Animal Clinic issued a statement on their website.  “We are absolutely appalled, shocked, upset, and disgusted by the conduct,” a spokesperson for the clinic wrote in a statement. “We condemn it in the strongest possible manner.”

Does a social media gaff have to have this type of shock factor in order to be noticed? The answer is no.  If your corporation only measures social media violations based on how far reaching they are, then stand by because the shock wave will come.

A couple of years ago, we conducted an exercise where one corporation wanted to measure the online footprint of some of their senior executives.  Everyone of the individuals bought into the exercise and were sure that their online footprints were essentially clean…..but, there’s always that one….  We had a look at some online dating sites and we stumbled upon one where people are looking for affairs.  We  put in a series of search criteria; location, age range (because everybody lies about it), height, hair color, eye color etc. Lo and behold a picture loads and it is the professional picture of one of our executives and it is the same picture used on the corporate website.

As you can imagine, this opened up a huge can of worms. The executive claimed his private life was private. The corporation claimed “not when you use the picture we own of you”.  It is so easy to see how these worlds can collide. I’m not at liberty to say what happened to this executive, but let’s just say the point was made.  Anyone, anywhere can make the connection between an individual and where they work.

When I read posts on social media I always look at who is making them. Especially those that threaten or break ethical boundaries. And each and everyday I am shocked at those who do not have a filter or a thought that what they might be posting is inappropriate for their positions.  But it makes for interesting reading, research and eventually fodder for my classes. When teaching in house sessions on social media risk I am always amused at the participants madly deleting posts and pictures throughout the duration of the class.

Some tips to keep your personal & professional reputations intact:

1)  Distance your personal and professional social media profiles.                                      If you have a professional reputation to protect then maybe don’t mention where                  you work on your personal social media profiles.

2) Think before you post.                                                                                                              If you think that your opinion or actions can come back and bite you professionally –            don’t post them. (And PS how many times have I seen someone make an                            inappropriate post and then claim their accounts were hacked? – nope don’t buy it)

3)  Disclaimers on social media mean nothing.                                                                         Those posts of “views are my own and don’t reflect the view of my employer” mean              absolutely nothing.  This will not prevent people from associating you with your                    employer, in fact, it usually draws people to look into who your employer is.

4)  Understand your social media policy and code of conduct                                               Remember that you only have one reputation.

As long as HR & Ethics departments think that what a person posts on their social media profiles is personal, then they do nothing to mitigate the risks involved for the corporation. There is no such thing as personal or private as long as a person uses social media. Worlds collide and merge as one – either like a good marriage or a bad one.

Nejolla provides training to corporations on social media risk and social engineering.